The 10 automotive species on the verge of extinction
In a first, Americans will likely buy more crossovers than midsize sedans this year — unseating the 4-door car as the default vehicle of choice. The crossover has become the family wagon equivalent of today, with hybrids and compacts SUVs expanding as the cars of choice for young singles, couples and families. A long list of other model types now find themselves in the less-visited areas of new car dealerships. These vehicles that once drew enough buyers to justify new engineering now represent the endangered species of the auto industry. Some are in decline, others nearly defunct, and a few, sadly, may never return. Here are ten automotive species struggling to survive in the 2010s:
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The 10 automotive species on the verge of extinction

In a first, Americans will likely buy more crossovers than midsize sedans this year — unseating the 4-door car as the default vehicle of choice. The crossover has become the family wagon equivalent of today, with hybrids and compacts SUVs expanding as the cars of choice for young singles, couples and families. A long list of other model types now find themselves in the less-visited areas of new car dealerships. These vehicles that once drew enough buyers to justify new engineering now represent the endangered species of the auto industry. Some are in decline, others nearly defunct, and a few, sadly, may never return. Here are ten automotive species struggling to survive in the 2010s:

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 Exploring the Concours d’LeMons, the show for the worst cars in America
The Concours D’Lemons has become, against some odds, an integral part of Pebble Beach weekend. Billed as “an ugly oil stain on Pebble Beach Car Week,” it provides a necessary antitode to the wealth and pomposity on display, featuring cars that no one wants but their owners — and even their owners don’t want them that much. It’s a National Lampoon-style parody of the whole pompous affair, showing another, and possibly more authentic, side of the car industry.
Full Story & Video High-res

Exploring the Concours d’LeMons, the show for the worst cars in America

The Concours D’Lemons has become, against some odds, an integral part of Pebble Beach weekend. Billed as “an ugly oil stain on Pebble Beach Car Week,” it provides a necessary antitode to the wealth and pomposity on display, featuring cars that no one wants but their owners — and even their owners don’t want them that much. It’s a National Lampoon-style parody of the whole pompous affair, showing another, and possibly more authentic, side of the car industry.

Full Story & Video

Maserati makes grand plans for revival at its 100th birthday party

Slip-sliding around Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca with Derek Hill in the world’s last Maserati Tipo 151 – a vintage honey that tore through LeMans in the early ‘60s – it’s possible to imagine that Maserati’s glory days were all in the past. But seeing the alluring Alfieri concept car unveiled for North America, it’s clear that Maserati has more in mind than being a nostalgia act.

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Jerry Seinfeld furious after driver inflicts shrinkage on rare Porsche 911
Well before “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” Jerry Seinfeld was known in automotive circles as a consummate car collector, especially for classic Porsches, and his garages include the first 911 built. And as any car collector knows, the value of owning such vehicles isn’t just in looking at them, but driving them as they were meant to be. Which is all great, right until someone uses your rare Porsche 911 as a slow-motion crash tester.
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Jerry Seinfeld furious after driver inflicts shrinkage on rare Porsche 911

Well before “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” Jerry Seinfeld was known in automotive circles as a consummate car collector, especially for classic Porsches, and his garages include the first 911 built. And as any car collector knows, the value of owning such vehicles isn’t just in looking at them, but driving them as they were meant to be. Which is all great, right until someone uses your rare Porsche 911 as a slow-motion crash tester.

Read Full Story